Recap: Day 3 – Tuesday, February 17

While colleagues back home in Washington, DC were snowed in, the delegates visited more sites in Limpopo province, from the South Africa-Zimbabwe border to Vhembe and back to Polokwane, before returning to Pretoria.

truckstop

Truck stop on South Africa-Zimbabwe border where the Trucking Wellness Center is located. Photo credit: Bright Phiri/MSH.

The day started with a visit to a Trucking Wellness Center, which is supported by the Corridor Empowerment Project, at a truck stop on the South Africa-Zimbabwe border. Southern Africa has a long history of cross-border migration and internal migration. People migrate for political, social, and economic reasons. Highly mobile workers include cross-border traders and truck drivers, among many others. Although data on HIV prevalence among mobile workers and migrant populations is scarce, existing data shows that HIV prevalence among these populations is considerably higher than in national adult populations. Migrants and mobile communities are therefore identified as one of the priority populations needing targeted HIV prevention interventions. As they toured the Trucking Wellness Center, delegates learned how civil society organizations in the Migration Corridor use US funding to provide vital health services to long-distance truck drivers, female sex workers, and border communities. By bringing health services to the truck stop, larger populations can be reached to have a greater impact.

After visiting the Trucking Wellness Center, the delegates traveled to Vhembe in Limpopo to visit the Tshikuwi Clinic. There, they learned about pharmaceutical management at the local level as they viewed the primary healthcare clinic’s pharmacy and met with the clinic’s Community Service Pharmacist (CSP) and her mentor to discuss the clinic’s stock management challenges and the strategies they implement to improve management capacity.

Delegates and staff from the Tshikuwi Clinic in Vhembe, South Africa. Photo credit: Bright Phiri/MSH.

Delegates and staff from the Tshikuwi Clinic in Vhembe, South Africa. Photo credit: Bright Phiri/MSH.

Before returning to Pretoria for the night, the delegates visited a loveLife Support Site with MSH

loveLife peer counselors brief delegates at the loveLife support site. Photo credit: Bright Phiri/MSH.

loveLife peer counselors brief delegates at the loveLife support site. Photo credit: Bright Phiri/MSH.

staff from the USAID-funded Building Local Capacity for the Delivery of HIV Services in Southern Africa (BLC) project. loveLife is South Africa’s largest national HIV prevention initiative for young people. It combines a sustained high-powered campaign with nationwide community-level outreach and support programs to promote healthy, HIV-free living among South African teens. At loveLife, delegates met with organization leaders and peer counselors to learn how loveLife provides leadership development and educational opportunities for youth capacity in the Migration Corridor.

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